Thursday, November 27, 2014
 
 
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Vegas Pro software features four sophisticated video scopes
Using the Vegas Pro color scopes
Looking at the Vectorscope, Waveform Monitor, Histogram and RGB Parade

Vegas Pro software features four sophisticated video scopes that you can use to analyze your video and gain insight into color correction filtering that you might need to do in order to achieve the best results possible. In this article, I'll talk about each of the four scopes and give you some examples of how they work and how you might use them to improve the look of your videos.   [FULL STORY]
 
 
 
With the improvements that we made to the closed captioning workflow in Vegas Pro 10 software, you can now create and export closed caption files for use with the videos you encode to WMV format whether for inclusion on a disc or for streaming over the web. That part's easy and we explain the exact techniques for doing so in our extensive training video that you'll find on the Seminar Series training package for Vegas Pro 10 software. In this article, I'll talk about how you can make those WMV closed captions viewable in the Windows Media Player.   [FULL STORY]
 
For the most part, you use the exact same techniques to work with files from your HDSLR as you do any other footage that you add to your Vegas Pro timeline. There are no specific "HDSLR-only" editing techniques that you need to learn, so if you already edit other types of footage with Vegas Pro software, use the same techniques for your HDSLR footage.   [FULL STORY]
 
One set of compositing controls remain largely unexplored and underutilized by perhaps most Vegas Pro editors. The composite mode options give you a wide range of control over the look of your project, but many people don't understand how they work. So in this article, we'll take a look at some examples that will help you understand how composite modes work and how you can use them to enhance your projects.   [FULL STORY]
 
Ten audio editing techniques that will not only help speed up your editing sessions, but also help you get more out of the application and accomplish more with it. Although I focus on Sound Forge Pro in this article, most of these techniques also work in Sound Forge Audio Studio 10, so you can take advantage of them regardless of the version you use.   [FULL STORY]
 
Think of Flow 2.0 essentials as a visual Dropbox for media assets, with versioning and time tracking. Let's take a look at a project I have setup.   [FULL STORY]
 
I've been an editor for a long time, and Media Composer has been one of my tools right from the start, and over the years, I've come across some good tricks to help enhance my workflow. Some might be obvious once you see them, but others can be a little bit more "hidden". Here are five of my top five "tricks" for Media Composer.   [FULL STORY]
 
 
 
 
By Kevin McAuliffe
We AVid users have had a BIG problem, and that was working with footage that was not OMF or (now) MXF. Any footage that wasn't captured via the digitize tool needed to be imported and converted to either OMF or MXF, and in many cases, the process was excruciatingly long if files weren't rendered with the Avid Codec. Thankfully, with Media Composer 5, that is no longer the case. [FULL STORY]

By Kevin McAuliffe
With Media Composer version 5, Avid is moving in not only a forward direction, but in a bit of a sideways direction as well. Premiere Pro CS5 and Final Cut Pro are drag-and-drop editing applications. This means that you can not only drag clips from the preview window and drop it into your timeline, but you now have an extensive amount of flexibility when dragging clips around in your timeline as well. [FULL STORY]

By Abba Shapiro
In this clip, host Abba Shapiro looks at how to create a freeze frame and a still image in Final Cut Pro. He iterates that you can park the playhead to any part of the video and grab a still image. He shows how to grab the freeze frame using the Modify>Make Freeze frame drop down command. He then shows how to create a still image and how to choose the file format that Final Cut enables you to save to. [FULL STORY]

By Abba Shapiro
In this clip, host Abba Shapiro discusses how to use subclipping using markers. He shows how to turn markers into subclips based upon the original markers in the movie. [FULL STORY]

By Abba Shapiro
In this clip, host Abba Shapiro shows how to use Final Cut Pro's variable speed control, showcasing how to change the speed of a clip over time. He detqails this with a clip, applying a qucik burst of speed, and then slowing down the clip again over time. [FULL STORY]


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